Cast Iron

Cast iron is strong, wear-resistant, and inexpensive. Because it's an extremely versatile material, this metal is used in literally thousands of industrial products. Therefore, welding cast iron is an essential process that welders and craftsmen in the industry must learn. Despite the brittle and temperamental qualities of cast iron, welding it is not impossible to do, provided that you have the right materials on hand.

Cast iron is difficult to work on because most nickel rods used by welders are harder compared to the base metal. Welding cast iron increases the base metal's tendency to crack, just like how a window with a rock cooled in the center is more likely to shatter into pieces. However, our electrodes possess a different metallurgical makeup—they are softer, highly machinable, and have unique properties that allow the weld to stretch and elongate up to 300 percent more than other rods. This helps prevents the base metal and weld from cracking in the process.

77 Cast Iron Electrode 72 Burnt Cast Iron Electrode SSF-6 Silver Solder
       
Sizes Available (in.) 5/32in, 1/8in, 3/32in 5/32in, 1/8in, 3/32in 1/16in
Sizes Available (mm) 3.96mm, 3.17mm, 2.38mm 3.96mm, 3.17mm, 2.38mm 1.58mm
Arc - TIG - Braze Arc - TIG Arc - TIG Braze
Works on engine blocks? Yes No Yes
Works on large cast iron holes? Yes Yes No
Joins cast iron to steel? Yes Yes No
Joins cast iron to metals other than steel? No No Yes
Works on exhaust manifolds, woodstoves, or other burnt cast iron? Good Great Good
Works on thin cast iron? Yes Yes Yes, even very thin
Color match? Good Good No
All position? Yes Yes Yes
Machineable? Yes No Yes
Paintable? Yes Yes Yes
Works over existing welds? Fair-- better on unwelded surface Fair Great
Crack resistant? Yes No Yes
Depth to bevel cracks 3/4 through 3/4 through 1/2 through

Pot Metal

Inexpensive casting alloys or pot metal can be difficult to work on because of their low melting point. Whether you're soldering pot metal for a repair job, or restoring original pot metal classic car parts, you can work on the alloy with ease and prevent it from pitting or breaking easily when you use quality rods from Muggy Weld.

Other rods melt at 700º and can be dangerously close to melting the metal before you even apply them. On the other hand, Super Alloy 1 from Muggy Weld has a melting point of 350º and unique properties that make pot metal restoration and repairs easier than ever before. To help you prevent damaging the base metal, the non-corrosive flux acts as a temperature guide turns root beer brown when the base metal reaches 350º. As the rod and flux work synergistically, Super Alloy 1 helps you make repairs that are as strong your base metal.

Super Alloy 1
   
Sizes Available (in.) 3/32in, 1/8in
Sizes Available (mm) 2.38mm, 3.17mm
Melting temperature 350° F (177° C)
Bonding strength 20,000 PSI
Flux type and shelf life Honey liquid, 2 year shelf life
Recommended torch Propane, MAPP, butane, oxyacetylene
Contains cadmium? Yes
Alloy color Silver
Metal warpage? No
Can bond thick to thin metals? Good
Can join copper, brass, and bronze to other metals? Yes
All position? Yes
Can be plated? Most metals except aluminum
Can be polished? Yes
Takes powder coating? Yes
Pre-cleaning necessary? Yes, with a wire brush, sanding, Dremel etc

Aluminum

These days, more and more parts are being replaced with aluminum parts. Why? Aluminum is lightweight, durable, and inexpensive in comparison with other metals. The problem is, most aluminum repair shops have been trained to believe that expensive machinery is needed to properly weld this versatile metal.

Aluminum melts at 1218°F. Unfortunately, it does not turn red like other metals before it reaches the point that it liquefies. If you have ever tried to weld aluminum you know that without an accurate temperature guide, you may end up cleaning your aluminum off the floor. For this reason, most shops in the past have recommended replacing aluminum parts rather than repairing them—which is not only expensive but unnecessary. Fortunately, times have changed.

Our unique line of welding alloys and fluxes for aluminum repair work synergistically to act as an exact temperature guide when welding aluminum. While many aluminum brazing products are sold without flux, we believe the use of flux to be superior for several reasons.

First, it allows the rod to flow better than aluminum rod alone. Any welder knows that flow is an important factor in successfully welding aluminum. Also, our flux acts as an exact temperature guide: Our Super Alloy 5 turns from powder to liquid at the exact moment when the rod should be applied. One the other hand, our Super Alloy 1 starts as a liquid and turns brown when ready for the rod. Finally, our Alloy 5 flux chemically reacts to clean up oxidation as well as other contaminates, which is very unique in the aluminum repair business.

Whether you are welding close to heat sensitive materials and need a super low solder or are welding through dirt, oil, paint or grease, our welding alloys allow you to weld aluminum quickly, easily and inexpensively with your own torch at less than half the temperature aluminum melts.

Note: Aluminum dissipates heat very quickly, therefore, oxyacetylene and Super Alloy 5 are required for all thick aluminum or large masses of aluminum.

Super Alloy 1 Super Alloy 5
     
Sizes Available (in.) 3/32in, 1/8in 3/32in, 1/16in
Sizes Available (mm) 2.38mm, 3.17mm 2.38mm, 1.58mm
Melting Point 350° F (177° C) 600° F (316° C)
Bonding Strength 20,000 PSI 30,000 PSI
Flux type and shelf life Honey liquid, 2 year shelf life Powder, 1 year shelf life
Recommended torch Propane, MAPP, butane, oxyacetylene Propane, MAPP, oxyacetylene
Can be polished? Fair Excellent
Can be plated? Yes Yes
Takes powder coating? Fair Excellent
Can be used on thick aluminum? No Yes, with oxyacetylene
Can join aluminum to other metals (brass, steel etc)? Yes No
Can repair radiators without burning fins? Yes No
Potential for metal warpage? No Potential
Can be used with TIG? No Yes
Can repair cast aluminum? No Yes, with oxyacetylene
Pre-cleaning necessary? Yes No
Can repair aluminum boats? No Yes, with oxyacetylene
Can be anodized? No Yes
Can be used with a soldering iron? No Yes
Demonstrated on pop cans at the county fair? NEVER NEVER

Aluminum Welding Videos

Stainless Steel

Although stainless steel is one of the most widely used metals, stainless steel welding can be extremely challenging. Cutting, drilling, soldering, and welding stainless steel is difficult mainly because the metal is a poor heat conductor and has a high rate of thermal expansion. It also reacts badly to excessive heat, causing it to warp. Thankfully, we have a unique line of products that can help make stainless steel soldering and brazing tasks easier.

Super Alloy 1, SSQ-6, and SSF-6 silver solder are all designed for use with stainless steel. Allowing for easier and more effective repair and welding jobs, many of our products melt at high temperatures and can be used on a variety of metals, such as brass, copper, bronze, cast iron, and stainless steel. For soldering and brazing tasks, or for welding stainless steel, SSQ-6 and SSF-6 can also be used with any heat source and can last for long periods with minimal care.

Super Alloy 1 SSF-6 Silver Solder SSQ-6 Silver Solder Paste
       
Sizes Available (in.) 3/32in, 1/8in 1/16in N/A
Sizes Available (mm) 2.38mm, 3.17mm 1.58mm N/A
Melting temperature 350°F (177°C) 1150°F (622°C) 1050°F (566°C)
Bonding strength 20,000 PSI Over 70,000 PSI Over 85,000 PSI
Flux type and shelf life Honey liquid, 2 year shelf life Flux coated Mixed in, 9 month shelf life
Recommended torch Any Any Any
Color match? Yes Yes Yes
Contains cadmium? Yes No No
Works in all positions? Yes Yes Yes
Will clean oxidized stainless?
Will wet to burnt stainless? No Yes No
Will join stainless to brass, steel, copper, cast iron? No Yes Yes
Can work as a jig? No No Yes
Recommended for heat sensitive parts? Yes No No

Steel

Steel is an alloy composed of iron and carbon—the higher the carbon content, the stronger, harder and more brittle the steel. There are many types of steel that can be used for steel welding jobs, all of which are categorized based upon various physical properties and carbon content. High carbon steel is very strong and it is used for files, cold chisels and various metal tools while low carbon steel is used for tubing, nails and castings.

Before you start welding steel, you will have to first determine the weldability of the metal. This is inversely proportional to its ability to be hardened by heat. Basically, this means that varieties of the metal with fewer alloying agents can easily be welded better than others.

Next, measure the equivalent carbon content of the different alloys of steel. This compares the properties of any steel alloy to those found in ordinary carbon steel. If possible, use only high strength, low-alloy metals specifically designed for welding steel.

Most jobs require only a hand held propane torch. Super Alloy 1 is recommended when heat or aesthetics is an issue. Otherwise we recommend our SSF-6 Silver Solder for torch welding: with a holding strength of 71,000 PSI, SSF-6 is as strong as a MIG or TIG weld, with a beautiful finish.

Steel repair on stainless steel can be very difficult; it is difficult to cut and is prone to distortion because of its high thermal expansion. Control the amount of ferrite in the weld to minimize hot cracking, preheat, and use steel welding and solder products such as Super Alloy 1, SSF-6, and SSQ-6 when working on different types of stainless steel.

Super Alloy 1 SSF-6 Silver Solder SSQ-6 Silver Solder Paste
       
Sizes Available (in.) 3/32in, 1/8in 1/16in N/A
Sizes Available (mm) 2.38mm, 3.17mm 1.58mm N/A
Melting temperature 350° F (177° C) 1150° F (621° C) 1050° F (566° C)
Bonding strength 20,000 PSI Over 70,000 PSI Over 85,000 PSI
Flux type and shelf life Honey liquid, 2 year shelf life Flux coated Mixed in, 9 month shelf life
Recommended torch Propane, MAPP, butane, oxyacetylene Any Any
Contains cadmium? Yes No No
Color match? No Good Good
Works in all positions? Yes Yes Yes
Works for heat sensitive parts? Great Fair Fair

Copper, Brass, Bronze

While copper, brass, and bronze may not be applications that are used every day in welding, industries such as refrigeration, electronics and plumbing—as well as ornamental artists, encounter these metals and perform brass, bronze, or copper welding jobs daily.

Here are some things to remember when working on brass, bronze, or copper:

Brass melts at around 1652-1724º F range and is fairly easy to cast. During any brass welding job, use high quality filler if the color doesn’t have to match the metal. Because of its relatively high melting point, low zinc brass can be braze-welded.

Super Alloy 1 can bond all of these metals in any combination, and can be used in bonding with other metals such as aluminum—at 350º F.

SSF-6 Silver Solder is 56% silver and is especially useful when high strength is needed, or when you need high flow to get to those hard to reach areas.

SSQ-6 Silver Solder Paste is the same formula as our SSF-6, in a convenient 1 oz syringe.

Super Alloy 1 SSF-6 Silver Solder SSQ-6 Silver Solder Paste
       
Sizes Available (in.) 3/32in, 1/8in 1/16in N/A
Sizes Available (mm) 2.38mm, 3.17mm 1.58mm N/A
Melting temperature 350°F (177°C) 1150°F (622°C) 1050°F (566°C)
Bonding strength 20,000 PSI over 70,000 PSI over 85,000 PSI
Flux type and shelf life Honey liquid, 2 year shelf life Flux coated Flux mixed in, 9 month shelf life
Recommended Torch Any Any Any
Alloy color Silver Silver Silver
Contains cadmium? Yes No No
Works in all positions? Yes Yes Yes
Potential for metal warpage? No Yes Yes
Bonds thick to thin metals? Good Great Great
Can join copper/brass/bronze to other metals? Yes Yes Yes