Premium Welding Supplies


Overview of Muggy Weld's entire line of premium welding supplies. Click links to view detailed product information.

You can count on Muggy Weld to provide premium welding supplies that will save you time and money on repairs. We serve welding-industry beginners and veterans alike by providing top products and educational resources. Whether you’re brazing aluminum, welding cast iron, soldering pot metal, or anything in between, our online welding store carries only the best products for you.

Discover reliable welding solutions with Muggy Weld.

Videos


Featured videos.
Please use the "view all videos" link below to access 100+ free instructional videos.

Premium Welding Rods and Fluxes for Brazing, Soldering and Welding

Muggy Weld promotional video featuring the entire Muggy Weld line of premium welding supplies: Super Alloy 1, Super Alloy 5, SSF-6 Silver Solder, SSQ-6 Silver Solder Paste, Heat Freeze Heat Paste (formerly Cool Blue), 77 Cast Iron Electrode, and 72 Burnt Cast Iron Electrode

Cast Iron Welding Tips with Muggy Weld 72 and 77 Rods

Youtube user Brandon Lund uses Muggy Weld 72 and 77 electrodes to weld a cast iron exhaust manifold. Brandon was a first time user of Muggy Weld products and gave step by step instructions for cast iron identification and cast iron welding.

How to Solder Zinc Die Cast or Pot Metal with Super Alloy 1

Super Alloy 1 demonstration of how to repair pot metal parts, quickly and easily. Pot metal is an alloy comprised primarily of zinc, copper, and tin that has been widely used in the construction of hood ornaments, grilles, door handles, steering wheel centers, and a variety of dash and trim pieces for antique autos. Tips for welding white metal.

Aluminum Welding, Brazing, & Soldering Products

Aluminum repair techniques featuring Muggy Weld's Super Alloy line--Super Alloy 1 and Super Alloy 5. Learn to weld, braze, and solder aluminum with a torch or TIG machine using Muggy Weld premium welding supplies.

Premium Welding Rods and Fluxes for Brazing, Soldering and Welding

Demonstration of all Muggy Weld products: Super Alloy 1, Super Alloy 5, SSF-6, SSQ-6, Heat Freeze, 72 burnt cast iron electrode and 77 cast iron electrode

Cast Iron Welding Tips with Muggy Weld 72 and 77 Rods

Youtube user Brandon Lund uses 72 and 77 electrodes to weld a dirty cast iron exhaust manifold

How to Solder Zinc Die Cast or Pot Metal with Super Alloy 1

Pot metal restoration and repair with Super Alloy 1 350°F solder. Ideal for classic cars and antique autos.

Aluminum Welding, Brazing, & Soldering Products

Aluminum welding, brazing and soldering with Muggy Weld alloys

Braze or Solder Copper to Stainless Steel Tubing

SSF-6 Silver Solder joins copper to stainless steel with a handheld torch

Welding Metals


View videos and product information sorted by parent metal

Testimonials


Another success story: two Mercruiser exhaust manifolds cracked over the winter due to the oversight (mine) of draining a couple of hoses. The manifolds were welded and reinstalled. At the lake yesterday, no leaks. Good product!

2nd Email:
Mike,

Thanks for the message. When I started up my boat before Easter, my heart sank when I saw water pouring out both exhaust manifolds (V-6, mercruiser). Fortunately, I have a neighbor who is truly a man of great knowledge and mechanical skill. I asked him about my situation. He initially recommended brazing, but learned of Muggy Weld through YouTube. I ordered 1/2# of #72 and 1/2 # of 77, but my neighbor only used the 77 rods - all seven on the repair. Both manifolds came out looking great and passed the water test last week with no leaks. I thought about taking photos of the cracks before the repair, but I felt so stupid since it was all my own fault that I didn't. I'll send you a photo of the manifolds installed that shows them looking great. The cracks were pretty bad. A replacement Mercruiser exhaust manifold is about $300. and both were cracked.

In peace, Mark Lawlor, Charlotte, NC

From the neighbor, David Fortenbery:
Mike and Mark,

I hope you don't mind Mark, (I guess I am giving away your secrets!) but I thought it might be helpful to Mike to outline the procedure used to fix the manifolds.

Mike, I am Mark's neighbor and helper. Here tis...

Opened the crack from end to end with grinder, flap wheel, Dremel...
Stop drilled end of each crack "leg" with .1875 bit.
As the cracks were in the water jacket only, we decided to use 7700 rod for machinability.
The manifolds were pre-heated to 450 degrees in oven for 2 hours.

We used a PowerCon 350 DC welder at about 70 amps, and welded 1 inch at a time. Immediately after the 1 inch of weld, we "shot peened" with air hammer and pointed chisel. This removed the slag and left the surface of the new weld dimpled. (golf ball-ish!)

This was repeated over and over until parts of the weld were "proud" to the rest of the manifold. The high spots were removed with flap wheel. This made the low areas very visible. We kept a Dremel with grinding disk handy and if we saw any little cracks, we ground them out and re-welded. Each weld was followed by peening.

As soon as the welded area was flush, we peened entire welded area and let the peening overlap the cast iron about .75 to 1 inch. This was to stress relieve, but had the added effect of giving the weld the appearance of a sand casting! Serendipity.

Then immediately back in oven at 450.

Repeated for second manifold. (When old Mark busts a manifold, he busts 'em both!)

After both were in oven, we decreased oven thermostat about 50 -100 degrees per hour and NEVER opened oven. After "cooking" overnight, they were done.

We worked out this procedure after studying your website and watching numerous videos on welding cast iron. This hyper young man (Chuck) has a whole series of videos that were very helpful to us... If you have not seen his videos, check him out and for heaven sakes, send him some Muggy rod!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yopcz-IYDyQ (this video is not specific to what we did, I listed it so you could find young Chucky)

Hollar if we can be of any assistance...

Dirty Dave

Mark Lawlor
Charlotte, NC

Got my Super Alloy 1 kit on Saturday and used it to repair a pewter tankard with a broken hinge on the lid.
In 40+ years as a jewelry repairman, pewter repair has always been considered "impossible" but the repair was fairly easy with the Super Alloy 1.
Heat control was very important as the tankard lid was very thin, but in the end the repair was strong & serviceable.
A quick touch-up with artist paint matched the old oxidized color of the lid & the customer was very happy.
Thanks for an excellent product & the online videos were very informative and helpful.

David Weinstein
The Jewel Shop Huntsville, AL

My Super Alloy 1 starter kit was delivered few days ago. I tried it in the damaged carburetor and it worked perfectly. I’ve been able to patch a crack and a hole and tap a new thread. Now it’s back to life!
This product is a lifeline for the vintage auto enthusiast.

I’m very satisfied! Thank you for your support.

Best regards,
Ernesto

P.S. I wrote a positive review on amazon.

Ernesto

Your SSF-6 product is great stuff. I've used it to fabricate and repair a number of tools and fixtures for our sewing business. I see you guys are in Olympia--glad to support a local company doing good work.

Matthew Kosh
Olympia, WA

Thank You MuggyWeld!

Seriously, i just received my Super Alloy #1 and used it! I found this product during a YouTube search and could not believe a product was this fast and easy to use. A local hardware store told me they had some aluminum brazing rod that would work on the project i was working on, boy where they wrong! Frustrated, I decided to order your product and to say the least i am impressed! This by far is the best product i have ever used, and i will continue to buy more!!!! I will post pics and project when they are done!

Excellent product, service and support.

Thanks a million!

Scott Liliental

Contact Us

Muggy Weld, LLC
PO Box 11927
Olympia WA 98508

866-684-4993
Hours:

Weekdays 9:00AM-5:00PM PST

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