Matchbox 36a Austin A50 1957 Restoration

Matchbox 36a Austin A50 1957 restoration using Muggy Weld Super Alloy 1 pot metal solder and flux, featured on Marty’s Makeover Magic.

Marty begins by using a dental tool and follows with a Dremel tool to preclean the Matchbox car parent metal prior to soldering.

Partial transcription from the video:

I was going to do 2 makeovers in one, but this little toy put up so much resistance that I ran out of time. So this is just the one off, this is an old school Marty’s Matchbox Makeover of yesteryear when I first started off and I would do these old vintage cars with no gimmicks and basic techniques. Because these are the kind of models that I first started out, it’s great to revist them because they are sadly neglected and often forgotten, as they were the genuine Matchbox originals.

The bumper bar needs dressing with a file. I did rub it over with some bronze wool–came out quite good, there are a couple dings there that I’m going to fill later. The front end is not too bad, that’s a little bit bent but I straightened that out. And here is the base and this is the bit that’s broken off that I’ve got to replicate.
This is going to be a first for me–I’ve also got to try and repair a tow bar. To do this I’m using a piece of this same Matchbox blend of metal that I use, this is a door off an old taxi that I had. This was in really terrible condition and I used it in an experiment and I actually welded it on there with a new product I’m trying out called Muggy Weld. And I was so pleased with the results that I thought “full steam ahead” on the real thing.

So to do it I used this little gas flamethrower and Muggy Weld Super Alloy 1 low temperature solder and flux. Now I’ve cut out a piece of metal in the right size and I’ve braced it up against the base of the model. This is part of the taxi door here and I’m hoping I can weld it on there. Just needs a little bit of heat in there and the Muggy Weld just melts and you can smear it around like peanut butter and with the flux it kind of migrates into the cracks. Seems pretty solid and actually makes quite a good bond.

Here is the back of it and you can see where the Muggy Weld welding rod has creeped through and made a little fillet there so it’s a really strong weld for such a small component and I’m actually able to dress it up with my grinding wheel on my Dremel and it doesn’t break off or show any signs of weakness whatsoever.

Thanks, Marty for featuring Super Alloy 1 on your YouTube channel. To view more of Marty’s videos, please visit his channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLM7pRUW6CmqqoAic24wbpQ