How to Repair Rare Parts: 1934 Chrysler Art Deco Emblem

102 How to Repair Rare Parts: 1934 Chrysler Art Deco Emblem

A Muggy Weld customer presented this rare pot metal/white metal classic car part to Mike for repair. The 1934 Chrysler art deco pot metal emblem had been damaged with a drill, and to keep the part original, the resulting hole would require a low temperature filler rod–Super Alloy 1 pot metal solder and flux kit.

First, Mike removed the oxidation with a Dremel tool (this step is essential to proper bonding).  Next, he placed a piece of wood underneath the part to “back” the repair and prevent the solder from falling through.

With the pot metal emblem prepared and ready to solder, Mike dipped the rod into the honey flux and applied it to the work area.

Mike then used his propane torch to gently and broadly pre-heat the rare part–be sure to indirectly heat the metal to avoid burning the flux.  Super Alloy 1’s flux acts as a visual temperature guide, transforming from golden yellow to a root beer brown when the parent metal has reached the 350°F working temperature.  If the flux is directly heated, it will change color before the parent metal has reached 350°F, which will negatively affect the bond.

When the flux changed color, Mike then applied the filler rod to fill the hole completely.   At proper working temperature, Super Alloy 1 will not discolor the existing chrome surrounding the hole during the soldering process.

He then allowed the part to cool naturally before removing the wood, and used a wire brush and warm water to remove the excess flux.

The end result is a completed repair that can be chrome plated and reattached to the car.

Note:  Always keep your torch moving when bringing the part to temperature. When you see the flux starting to turn brown, add a couple more drops of flux just before tinning the surface with the rod. This technique will help to build a bridge around and across the hole.

 

NotePlease observe all AWS Safety & Health Guidelines when using Muggy Weld products.